Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Famous Chef "Charles Ranhofer "





Charles Ranhofer Delmonico's Chef



I alway's read my friend Pat's blog, Mille Fiori
When she did the post on Delmonico's Restaurant
I flipped out.
Ranhofer was born in St Denis France Nov.7 1836
He was buried in woodlawn Cemetery New York Oct.9 1899.
In May 1862 Lorenzo Delmonico hired
Charles Ranhofer as Chef de Cuisine at the 14th Street
(union Square) Delmonico's.


Ranhofer had studied cooking in Paris at age 12, by the time
he was 20 he was the chef for Prince Henin of Alsace.
He came to the U.S. in 1856 where he was the chef for the
Russian Consul in Washington D.C.




Ranhofer also went to New Orleans where he learned Creole cooking..
He returned to France to work on the
elaborate Balls of Napoleon 111 at the Palace.
In 1861 he returned to the states,and worked at
Delmonico's. It is said he "MADE" Delmonico's

He created:
Sarah potatoes- for Sarah Bernhardt
Veal Pie a la Dickens -for Charles Dickens
Salad a la Dumas- for Alexander Dumas
Lobster newberg- for a Famous Sea Capt. Ben Wenberg

He retired in 1896 had five children, 3 boys 2 girls and a wife Rose. He died in 1899 of brights disease.



Ever since I was a little girl growing up in Houston, my Dad told stories of New Your City.
Delmonico's , the Astor, and Broadway. The Hansom cab rides through Central park.
The Maple and birch trees. To a child in Houston, these stories of Pheasant underglass at Delmonico.and
Zigfield Follies, Staten Isle Ferry,Coney Island, The Hamptons.
All I ever wanted to do was see NYC.




Before my Dad Passed away he gave me a huge cook book.

THE EPICUREAN .
We sat down and he said,
Yvonne I never got to take you to Delmonico's like we talked about,
but here is the Delmonico's
Cook Book from the worlds Greatest Chef.




I took a photo of it as it's the biggest cook book I have ever seen.
I have been offered $500 for it. Nope, it goes to my Daughter.
The woodcut designs are fabulous
This is the front page.
















Believe it or not I made this mold out of chopped chicken liver, sliced black olives, and a real pineapple top, for a banquette at the Eden Roc.
Years later, I had a summer Resort in N.C. I had a wonderful menu.
Stealing in the kitchen was one of my problems. I applied for a Job in the Kitchen of the Eden Roc Hotel during the peak of the season. I was refused. No women work in the Kitchen. The Catering manager was nice and offered me a job.
I said No, I want the Kitchen. The answer was NO , he even walked me to the entrance gave the valet my parking ticket. When the Cadillac was driven up, he saw all the race track stickers. he looked surprised. I drove away turned around and parked the car across the street.
Now I knew how to get to the Kitchen and I gave a $5 to a busboy and asked him to point out the Chef.I told him I would picket if he didn't hire a woman.

GOT the job
I became the first woman to work with Chef Dobelle and in the Eden Roc Kitchen. He made me Garde Manger
Dobelle gave me an education that season..
I told him about my Resort and he gave me great advice.
Hey! I earned it that year.
Working there was a story in it's self.
It was only for the Season.



These are a few pages I took from the book all different table settings









if you were Dutch ,.
Just Imagine this delivered to your table





Some pretty dessert huh?





There are pages of Ice designs for many occasions














Pheasant under Glass, I am sure in Delmonico's it was a whole bird on a sterling platter with great oval glass dome.


Posted by Yvonne Rosenfield @ La Petite Gallery
comments are welcome


10 comments:

Karena said...

Yvonne,

What an amazing account. You father must have been an amazing man and the apple did not fall far from the tree!

Those book images, astounding!

xoxo
Karena
Art by Karena

joanny said...

Yvonne:

Wonderful memories you share with us- you are quite the "Lady" unique and lovely. All the places you mentioned are all very much a part of my past, My family members are buried in Woodlawn Cemetery - know all the places in NYC you wrote about. Ah Yvonne you take for a walk down memory lane.

Your cookbook is as priceless and so are you.

warm wishes,
joanny

Lord Cowell said...

What beautiful woodcuts. That book is legendary, and all the more special due to it belonging to your father.

Thank you too for your messages of support after the earthquake.

Fondest Regards,
David.

Leovi said...

Excellently researched and very interesting this post, I really have done with much love and so I say, thank you. Great.

Thistle Cove Farm said...

This was an amazing post; I've eaten at the NY restaurant and the food was fabulous. The ambiance was fabulous as well -smile-.

Janis said...

WOW wow wow, Yvonne, you are indeed an amazing woman! What a treasure, the memories of your father and the most fantastic cookbook ever! Thanks for stopping by today; yes, those gold rims have never seen the inside of the dishwasher, or a piece of scotchbrite; I wash them carefully by hand! Wishing you a lovely weekend....

French Basketeer.com said...

oh no posted under the wrong name, that is Andrea/French Basketeer not Janis!

Ima Weed said...

This was just great! You have done some most interesting things with your life.

Jean Hart said...

Yvonne, you are so interesting.
I love that you did not stop at no. The pictures of your book are and the family memories are turly inspiring.
great post

harry haff said...

I just stumbled upon your blog by accident. I was looking for photos of Ranhofer, America's greatest chef, to put on my web site. He forms an important part of my book, The Founders of American Cuisine, which was just published February 2011, about the time you made this post! If you get a chance take a look at the site where there is a drop down on each of the cookbook authors.
Great post. www.harryhaff.com